INTIMATE LANDSCAPES OF THE ENCHANTMENTS

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USAHuckleberry leaves glowed scarlet against the glacier-rounded granite

When I backpacked to Horseshoe Lake and Lake Stuart in The Enchantments in early October, I knew that I would be photographing lovely landscapes filled with rugged mountains, serene lakes, golden larches, and (hopefully) Mountain Goats. All of those scenes came vividly to life in a landscape so breathtaking, I could hardly bear to leave. I took hundreds of photographs of the Mountain Goats that joyously greeted us, and hundreds of photographs of Alpine Larches and dramatic mountainscapes.

But when I’m out in the wilderness, Big Landscapes are only part of what I seek. I also like the sun on my face, the scent of forest mushrooms in the air, the way scarlet autumn leaves play along a granite surface, the perfect reflections of golden sedges at the edge of a pond. In short, I love the intimate landscapes as much as I love the Big Landscapes, perhaps more. This blog post is a visual celebration of the intimate landscapes that caught my eye. Think of these as haiku, in comparison with the epic poetry of the vast and breathtaking scenes.

Swamp Horsetail Massed along Lake Stuart in The EnchantmentsSwamp Horsetails thrived in dense colonies along the shore of Stuart Lake; I was astounded at the brilliant yellow-green color when they caught the late afternoon and early evening light

Swamp Horsetail and Waves along Lake Stuart in The EnchantmentsAt the edge of our campsite, I photographed the reflections of the blue sky, mountains, and horsetails on the small waves lapping the shore (while I left Karen to set up the tent on her own)

Swamp Horsetail with Wave-distorted Reflections in Lake StuartLate in the afternoon of the first day, the sun broke out across Lake Stuart; here the waves reflect the sunlit cliffs and forests in a bright abstract pattern

Swamp Horsetail at Edge of Lake Stuart in Predawn LightEarly the next morning, before the sun rose, Lake Stuart was perfectly quiet, with the mountains across the lake reflecting among the horsetails

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USAIn a wetland farther up the valley, along the way trail leading to Horseshoe Lake, the clumps of autumn sedges glowed a rich gold among the cottongrass

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USAWe are familiar with Cottongrass from sphagnum bogs in the midwest and vast stretches of Alaskan tundra; it was good to see it again here in the wetland. It actually is a sedge rather than a grass, and the seeds float in the air to new destinations much like dandelion or milkweed seeds.

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USAWe climbed the steep trail to Horseshoe Lake, then broke into small huckleberry meadows with granite outcrops and views of the mountains above the lake 

Mushroom Associated with Alpine Larch Trees Near Horseshoe LakeThere were numerous large mushrooms, about four to six inches in diameter, that live in association with the Alpine Larch roots; these relatives of boletes MAY be edible and excellent, but there are two species with similar habits and one is less edible than the other, and we weren’t able to identify them in the field

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USAAutumn sedges in a wet meadow, in a photograph with an impressionistic feel

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USAMany of the Alpine Larches were at their peak of color; they stand with the Whitebark Pines as the last bastion of trees at timberline

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USAAlpine Larches have exquisitely soft needles that turn golden in the fall, then drop off when October winds scour the basin

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USAWe camped along Horseshoe Lake; the next morning I photographed the granite outcrops and quiet lake before the sun awakened the scene

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USAMost trees reach to the sky; this larch bowed down to the granite, apparently in response to heavy winter snows that piled on top of it

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USAIt is rare that I see such photogenic sedges in the mountains, and I loved the pattern of the autumn-tinged clumps against a tarn reflecting the blue sky

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USAChartreuse Wolfia lichen growing abundantly on a branch, with a selfie of my wrist

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USAIn a glacial cirque above Horseshoe Lake, a stream winds gracefully through a meadow that just lost its snows from last winter in the last month or so; this stream flows into Horseshoe Lake

Ice Cave Under Remnant Snow Field in The EnchantmentsIn the cirque, a couple of remnant snow fields remained and, where the tiny creek flowed under the snow, an ice cave formed. Such caves can collapse, so I just crawled into the entrance to take a series of photographs.

Ice Cave Under Remnant Snow Field in The EnchantmentsThe scalloped patterns inside the cave were typical of others I’ve entered … other worldly!

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USAHere it was October, and there were still some wildflowers blooming because the snow had melted out so recently. Shooting Star is among my favorite mountain flowers; it thrives in wet meadows, and I inevitably get soaked when I lay down to photograph it.

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USAGentians are more typical of late season wildflowers, but October is even late for them

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USAThe talus slope above the wet meadow was alive with Pikas, those small rabbit-relatives who live among the rocks and put away cut greens in order to get through the long winter under the snow. They don’t hibernate, so they need plenty of food.

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USAThe stream through the meadow took a very meandering course; beyond the stream you can see the talus slope where the Pika live, as well as some young Alpine Larches growing among the boulders.

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USAGolden Alpine Larches and golden autumn sedges at Jack Lake; the richness of color is the last gasp before the high country is deep in snow

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USAClumps of sedges grace the edge of Jack Lake, as if carefully placed by a landscape artist

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USAOne of the sedge clumps gracefully reflecting in Jack Lake

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USAJust prior to our hike, a fierce windstorm apparently blasted through The Enchantments, because there were numerous fallen fresh Alpine Larch branches wherever we went

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USAWhen the granite cracks and weathers, soil accumulates in the cracks, giving huckleberries a habitat to explore 

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USAAlpine Larches and Whitebark Pines live to a hearty old age in the high country. When they eventually fall, the weathered wood shows one of the secrets of their strength: spiraling twisted grain that can withstand high winds and heavy snows better than perfectly straight grain

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USASuch patterns also look good in black-and-white photography

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USAI love photographing these fallen warriors, with their tough bones

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USALichens on the granite can be ancient and colorful; this pattern looked like it was left by an ancient civilization

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USAHorseshoe Lake is ringed with smooth granite outcrops; the perfect place for a human to dip water for breakfast or a Mountain Goat to take a sip

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USAOne windy night the moon was bright behind the trees; I photographed the shadow of one Alpine Larch with the moon glow dancing off the waves around it and got this ethereal result

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USAAn impressionistic view of huckleberry leaves and distant larches

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USAA cloud catching alpenglow at sunset

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USAThe Alpine Larches were awe-inspiring; the equivalent of Vermont’s Sugar Maples or Colorado’s Trembling Aspens

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USASpeaking of aspens: on the hike out, we came upon a couple of Trembling Aspen groves trying to compete with the Alpine Larches for the camera’s attention; aspens are not nearly as common in the Cascade Mountains as they are in the Rocky Mountain West

The Enchantments, Okanogan–Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USAWe found these blue-black clumps of mushrooms on the way out; it turns out that they are relatives of the chanterelles, but didn’t taste nearly as good, at least to our palates

To see thousands of my photographs in large file sizes for use in magazines or other printed materials or electronic media, go to my NEW website at Lee Rentz Photography or go to my Flickr Photostream.

I would like to thank my wife, Karen Rentz, and our companion, Junko Waibel, for all their patience during my epic time spent making photographs on this trip.

 

Explore posts in the same categories: Adventure, autumn, cascades, hiking, landscape, lee rentz, national forests, nature, outdoor, photo, photography, recreation, travel, washington

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7 Comments on “INTIMATE LANDSCAPES OF THE ENCHANTMENTS”

  1. Greg Vaughn Says:

    Fantastic set of photos from a fantastic place! Looks like you hit the timing and weather just right.

  2. Sudhakar Says:

    Excellent photography Lee ! It’s another world !

  3. itchierfeet Says:

    Beautiful landscapes and colours.

  4. Mary Brisson Says:

    So many breathtaking images here, I could not possible choose a favorite. Thank you for showing them.
    Mary


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