THE AMISH IN WINTER

The Amish live close to the land, necessarily incorporating seasonal rhythms into their lives. After all the plowing and planting and nurturing and harvesting, the landscape breathes a sigh of relief as the world enters winter dormancy.

But not the Amish. Their lives are still busy with the daily rhythms of farm life. The horses and chickens must be fed. The children must walk to their one-room schools. Ice must be harvested. Laundry must be washed and then dried out on the line. The sawmills continue operating. Wood must be cut for warmth. Barns are built. Quilts are sewn. Sunday worship is not to be missed, as the believers gather in one home, converging from nearby homes by foot and by buggy.

It is a life apart, and that’s what those of us viewing from the outside find enchanting and ultimately unknowable, because we can only view the surface.

The photographs here represent six winters of quietly and respectfully observing these families at an undisclosed location in central Michigan.

SCHOOL CHILDREN BLIZZARD WHITE BORDER MASTER
Girls and boys walking home from school in a blizzard
Barn Raising in an Amish Community in Central Michigan
Amish men from the community come together for a barn-raising
Amish Clothesline in Central Michigan
Amish laundry in black and white
BUGGY TRACKS WHITE BORDER MASTER
Buggy tracks in fresh snow
CORN SHOCKS WHITE BORDER MASTER
Amish corn shocks in a blizzard
DEEP SNOW BUGGY WHITE BORDER MASTER
Deep snow passage
Michigan
Affection among the work horses
ICE WAGON WHITE BORDERS MASTER
Transporting ice blocks freshly cut from a pond
Clothesline in an Amish Community in Central Michigan
Towels drying in a winter breeze
Amish One-Room Schoolhouse
One room school
SUNDAY SERVICES WHITE BORDER MASTER
Coming together for Sunday Services
THREE SHEEP WHITE BORDERS MASTER
Three sheep with greenhouses
TURNING BUGGY WHITE BORDERS MASTER
Heading home in a blizzard
TWO HORSES WHITE BORDER MASTER
Two sleek horses taking a break from hauling buggies
Horse-drawn Buggy in an Amish Community in Central Michigan
Ready to leave
Michigan
Mother and child in an Amish barn

For more information about my photography, go to leerentz.com

Author: leerentz

BS and MS in natural resources, with early career work as an artist and nature center director. Became a full-time photographer in 1990. Sells photographs at art shows nationwide. Publication credits include National Geographic, Alaska Magazine, National Wildlife, Audubon, and scores of other magazines, books, calendars, and electronic media.

4 thoughts on “THE AMISH IN WINTER”

  1. Lee:

    Nice – different seeing all of those photographs in black and white. Really looks artfully historical.

    Michael D. Brandt
    BRANDT LAW GROUP
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